Category Archives: Language & Terms

Put Some “ish” in Your English

What’s the difference between someone saying “I’m hungry” and “I’m hungryish”? You’ll hear a lot of words ending in “-ish” in conversational English, but what does this suffix (word ending) really mean? Find out about the differences in how we … Continue reading

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Don’t Ever Say “Thank”

There are some nouns in English that are only used in the plural (with an -s at the end). Learn why you should never use these nouns in the singular: thanks/congratulations contents earnings amends For more on plural nouns, see … Continue reading

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Guess Where These Words Come From

I recently talked about “loanwords” in a short video about “glitch” and “ketchup.” Today, I talk about three more common loanwords in English: cul-de-sac kudos angst To expand your vocabulary even faster, check our our Unlimited English Membership here. ~Jeff … Continue reading

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“Literally” is Literally English’s Most Confusing Word

“Literal” and “figurative” are two types of meaning in English, but they are often confused (even by native English speakers!). Learn the difference between them in this video, and why Americans who say “I was literally starving” will not die … Continue reading

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How Not to be a Sucker in English

The famous showman P.T. Barnum said, “There’s a sucker born every minute.” (Learn more about P.T. Barnum in our Cultural English 257 here.) Learn in this video what a “sucker” is, why you do *not* want to be one, and … Continue reading

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Words English Stole from Other Languages

A loanword is a term one language takes from another language to use with little or no change to the word itself. English has “stolen” lots of words from other languages! Learn about the meaning and uses of two of … Continue reading

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3 Things You Should Never Say to Your Boss

There are lots of expressions we use with friends or informally that you don’t want to use at work with your boss. In this video, I talk about three of them: -Get lost! -That’s above my paygrade. -Whatever. For more … Continue reading

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3 Expressions You Won’t Find in Your Texbooks

Conversational English includes a lot of expressions you will usually not find in an English textbook. Today I explain 3 common idioms in English: To flake out/to be a flake To call shotgun To scoot over For more vocabulary related … Continue reading

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Giving Up versus Giving In

Learn how to use three popular phrasal verbs in English: To give up To give up (something) To give in For more on giving up and similar phrases, check out our Daily English 524 – Talking About Failure. ~Jeff P.S. … Continue reading

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Sizing Up Your English

There are lots of idioms related to the word “size” in English. Size means, of course, how big or small something is. In this video, I explain the different ways of using the following four popular idioms: To size (someone/something) … Continue reading

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