Category Archives: Language & Terms

More American Football English

On Tuesday, I explained how American football is played and talked about the useful football-related term “to huddle.” Here are two more expressions related to football that we use in everyday English. Take a Punt In football, when your team … Continue reading

Posted in Language & Terms | Comments Off on More American Football English

Football, American (English) Style

The American football season (time of year) started a few weeks ago. Americans don’t call it “American football,” of course – it’s just football. That other sport the rest of the world calls “football” is known as “soccer” in the … Continue reading

Posted in Language & Terms, Life in the United States | Comments Off on Football, American (English) Style

Should You Do The Hustle? (Video)

“Hustle” has several different meanings in English. Find out what they are in this short video: And take a look at our Cultural English 226 lesson, where we talk more about “hustle.” ~Jeff P.S. Like this short English lesson? Get … Continue reading

Posted in Discussing the Episodes, Language & Terms | Comments Off on Should You Do The Hustle? (Video)

What is an “Empty Nest”? (Video)

What does it mean to have an “empty nest”? Find out in this short 3-minute video: Check out the lesson I talk about in this video, Daily English 444 – Planning for Retirement. And get more information on our Unlimited … Continue reading

Posted in Discussing the Episodes, Language & Terms | Comments Off on What is an “Empty Nest”? (Video)

3 Expressions That Don’t Mean What You Think They Mean

As you know, just learning the meaning of individual words isn’t enough to understand everyday English. There are many expressions for which simply defining the meaning of each individual word would be misleading (give you the wrong idea). That’s what … Continue reading

Posted in Language & Terms | Comments Off on 3 Expressions That Don’t Mean What You Think They Mean

Raising versus Begging the Question

In our Daily English 210 – A Family Road Trip, we use the expression, “to question the wisdom of (something).” In this short video, I explain two more expressions with “question”: to raise the question and to beg the question. … Continue reading

Posted in Language & Terms | Comments Off on Raising versus Begging the Question

In the Line of Duty

Like many of you, I’ve mostly been staying home over the past few months, and I’ve been catching up on (doing what others have already done) some TV series. One I’ve enjoyed is a British series called Line of Duty. … Continue reading

Posted in Language & Terms, Life in the United States | Comments Off on In the Line of Duty

Being Locked Down is Better Than Being Locked Up

Many countries have used lockdowns to respond to the coronavirus. A lockdown is when people in a place or area are prevented from leaving or traveling around freely: “There are lockdowns in many U.S. cities that have closed restaurants.” In … Continue reading

Posted in Language & Terms | Comments Off on Being Locked Down is Better Than Being Locked Up

Dad Jokes

Last Sunday was Father’s Day in the United States, so it’s a good time to talk about “Dad jokes.” In recent years, people have started classifying (identifying; labeling) certain not-very-sophisticated jokes as “Dad jokes.” These are usually simple jokes, often … Continue reading

Posted in Language & Terms | Comments Off on Dad Jokes

Blood is Thicker Than Water

Americans will celebrate Father’s Day this Sunday, June 21st, so it’s a good time to talk about expressions in English related to family and relatives (people related to you by blood). One well-known saying is “Blood is thicker than water.” … Continue reading

Posted in Language & Terms | Comments Off on Blood is Thicker Than Water