Hot for Teacher’s Grade*

School begins in a few weeks, to the great joy and happiness of parents everywhere.

What does it take (what do you need) to be successful in American schools?

Being successful in an American school requires, as in other schools throughout the world, that you do your homework and study, of course.

But that is certainly not the only thing that helps determine how well you perform in school, at least as measured by your GPA.

GPA stands for “grade point average,” which is the combination of your grades from all of your classes. GPAs usually go from 0.0 (lowest) to 4.0 (highest).**

A 2009 research study found that there are other things that appear to influence teachers in determining student grades besides (in addition to) how well they do on their homework and examinations.

This isn’t too surprising, but what exactly are those things?

The researchers surveyed (asked) more than 20,000 high school students. They asked them to rate (give a grade or points) to each student on three factors (characteristics):

  • their attractiveness (whether they are good looking or not);
  • their grooming habits (whether they brush their hair, dress neatly, etc.); and
  • their overall personality (that is, if they are pleasant to be with, positive, easy to talk to, etc.).

The study found that these three factors did seem to influence student grades, or at least were associated (connected to) their grades.

But the specific factors were different for boys and girls.

For a boy, good grooming was correlated (associated with; related to) an increase in his grade.

Boys who were slovenly (messy, not neat with one’s clothing and hair) got significantly lower grades from teachers.

This was definitely me in school – very slovenly! Now I know why I got a poor grade in differential calculus and advanced physics.

For girls, having a pleasant personality was the most important factor correlated with grades. Good grooming was less important than it was for boys, perhaps because overall girls are more careful in their grooming than boys are.

Perhaps most interesting result in this study of American schools was the finding (a conclusion based upon the data of the study) that very attractive girls actually suffered a slight (small) decrease (drop) in grades because of their beauty.

This may be due to the fact that many teachers think that beautiful girls are somehow not very smart. Unfortunately, the study did not interview teachers to see what they said.

Do you think these three factors – attractiveness, grooming habits, and personality – affect or influence student grades in the schools where you live?

~Jeff

*To be hot for (someone) means to be sexually attracted to him/her. There was a controversial song when I was young called “Hot for Teacher.”

**Some schools now use GPAs higher than 4.0, but we won’t worry about those here.

P.S.Want to start improving your English? Try a FREE 30-minute English lesson.

  • Do you have difficulties remembering the “right” word when speaking in English?
  • Do you have to stop and think about everything you want to say in English?
  • Do you get lost when someone speaks English quickly to you?

Then you need to try one of our Unlimited English lessons from ESLPod.com!

Used by more than 1.27 million people in 189 countries, our Unlimited English lessons are designed to help you understand English so you can speak it.

Just fill out the form below and we’ll send a FREE lesson to try!

We hate spam, too! We will never sell, rent, or give your information to anyone – ever!

What Will I Learn in My Free Lesson?

Here is just a small part of what you’re going to learn in this free lesson:

  • What “take a rain check” means and how to use it in a conversation . . .
  • The difference between a “recluse” and a “busybody” . . .
  • Why “to fend OFF” means something from “to fend FOR” . . .
  • What it means to “take a rain check,” “keep to yourself,” and “to appoint (someone)” . . .
  • What a social secretary is . . .
  • The best way to use “to sort out” and “to turn down” . . .
  • How to use phrasal verbs like “to settle in” and “to settle down” (they’re not the same!) . . .

And much, much more!

Posted in Life in the United States | Comments Off on Hot for Teacher’s Grade*

Dear LA: I love you. I hate you.

A few blocks from my house, the owner of a very large house recently painted a message to everyone who drives or walks past (see photo). It reads:

“Dear LA,

I love you. I hate you.

I love you. I hate you.

I love you.”

What does it mean?

I haven’t talked to the homeowners (people who own/have a house) who painted this, but I understand what they are saying.

When you live in a big city like Los Angeles (or anywhere, really), there are things you love about your city and at least a few things you hate.

If you live in a place a long time, you’ll likely love more things than you hate. If you didn’t, you would move to another city.

The homeowners says “I love you” three times, and “I hate you” only twice, so I am assuming that they love LA more than hate it.

What are the things that I love about LA? What things do I hate? Here’s a quick list:

THINGS I LOVE

  1. Great food from all over the world that doesn’t cost too much.
  2. A mix of people, languages, and cultures like few other cities in the world.
  3. The weather.
  4. Enough artistic and cultural sites to keep me busy and interested (but not as many as New York City, I admit).
  5. The constant influx (arrival) of new “Angelenos” (someone living in LA) who come to the city to fulfill (get done) their dreams. It brings the city life and hope.
  6. The weather.

THINGS I HATE

  1. The traffic. There are too many cars (and people) everywhere you go.
  2. Many people’s sense of entitlement, thinking that the rest of the world owes them something, and they should get it.
  3. The city government (a disaster, like California’s state government).
  4. Crime (see #3). It’s much safer in LA now than when I moved here almost 30 years ago, but there are still too many thefts (things stolen) and murders.
  5. The traffic.

So that’s six “loves” and five “hates.” For now, I guess I’ll stay in Los Angeles.

What are things that you love and hate about the city where you live?

~Jeff

WAIT!
Before You Go . . .

Start Improving Your English Again with a FREE 30-Minute English Lesson!

  • Do you have difficulties remembering the “right” word when speaking in English?
  • Do you have to stop and think about everything you want to say in English?
  • Do you get lost when someone speaks English quickly to you?

Then you need to try one of our Unlimited English lessons from ESLPod.com!

Used by more than 1.27 million people in 189 countries, our Unlimited English lessons are designed to help you understand English so you can speak it.

Just fill out the form below and we’ll send a FREE lesson to try!

We hate spam, too! We will never sell, rent, or give your information to anyone – ever!

What Will I Learn in My Free Lesson?

Here is just a small part of what you’re going to learn in this free lesson:

  • What “take a rain check” means and how to use it in a conversation . . .
  • The difference between a “recluse” and a “busybody” . . .
  • Why “to fend OFF” means something from “to fend FOR” . . .
  • What it means to “take a rain check,” “keep to yourself,” and “to appoint (someone)” . . .
  • What a social secretary is . . .
  • The best way to use “to sort out” and “to turn down” . . .
  • How to use phrasal verbs like “to settle in” and “to settle down” (they’re not the same!) . . .

And much, much more!

Posted in Life in the United States | Comments Off on Dear LA: I love you. I hate you.

What to Say to Someone Traveling

It’s summertime, and that means it’s time for millions of people to take a vacation.

When someone tells you they’re going on a vacation, what do you say to them in English?

Find out in this very short (1 minute!) video:

WAIT!
Before You Go . . .

Start Improving Your English Again with a FREE 30-Minute English Lesson!

  • Do you have difficulties remembering the “right” word when speaking in English?
  • Do you have to stop and think about everything you want to say in English?
  • Do you get lost when someone speaks English quickly to you?

Then you need to try one of our Unlimited English lessons from ESLPod.com!

Used by more than 1.27 million people in 189 countries, our Unlimited English lessons are designed to help you understand English so you can speak it.

Just fill out the form below and we’ll send a FREE lesson to try!

We hate spam, too! We will never sell, rent, or give your information to anyone – ever!

What Will I Learn in My Free Lesson?

Here is just a small part of what you’re going to learn in this free lesson:

  • What “take a rain check” means and how to use it in a conversation . . .
  • The difference between a “recluse” and a “busybody” . . .
  • Why “to fend OFF” means something from “to fend FOR” . . .
  • What it means to “take a rain check,” “keep to yourself,” and “to appoint (someone)” . . .
  • What a social secretary is . . .
  • The best way to use “to sort out” and “to turn down” . . .
  • How to use phrasal verbs like “to settle in” and “to settle down” (they’re not the same!) . . .

And much, much more!

Don’t wait – try it now! It’s’ FREE!

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on What to Say to Someone Traveling

Summer Vacation is Here. Who Wants to Go Camping?

July and August are traditionally (usually) the most popular months for people to take a vacation.

Some stay in hotels. Some stay with friends. Some rent an apartment or small house.

But many Americans like to take vacation by going camping. In the U.S., that often means traveling in an RV, or recreational vehicle.

An RV is a large vehicle that people can live, cook, and sleep in while they are traveling (see photo).

Some people call these RVs “houses on wheels,” because large RVs have everything that one would find in a house – a bathroom, kitchen, and even a TV!

RVs are expensive to buy and maintain (to keep something in good condition). They also use a lot of gas, but many people like RVs because they’re cheaper than staying in hotels, even after renting them or buying them.

There is a large group of Americans who even choose to travel around in RVs during their retirement (the time in life when older people have stopped working), sometimes living permanently in them.

Some campsites (places where people can stay overnight, usually in tents) have special sections for RVs.

But many with RVs choose to stay in RV parks that are exclusively (only) for RVs. RVs need water and sewage hookups (connections to receive water and get rid of waste water), and RV parks offer these for a small fee.

Even if you’re not going to rent an RV this summer, you can still combine your vacation with learning English. A good way is to listen to some of our lessons about vacations and camping. Start with these:

You can also try watching some popular movies about RVs and long driving vacations.

National Lampoon’s Vacation, for example, is a comedy where the Griswold family goes on vacation driving across the country. They have many problems on their vacation, such as getting lost, having accidents, and running out of money.

Another, more recent movie about RVs is simply called RV.

In this comedy, a family rents (pays money to use something for a short period of time) an RV to go on vacation. They have many problems with the RV, including its brakes (the things that slow down or stop a car) and its water and sewage hookups.

But life isn’t a movie (unless you live here in Los Angeles). Lots of Americans enjoy their time seeing different parts of our vast (huge) country in an RV.

Are RVs popular where you live? Do a lot of people go camping?

Jeff

P.S. Get 1800+ lessons with our Unlimited English Membership. Find out more here.

WAIT!
Before You Go . . .
Get our FREE, 9-Page Special Report
“5 Things You MUST Know to Improve Your English”

Learn how to improve your English faster than ever with the latest, research-proven methods. Download it to find out more!

Just fill out your first name and email address below to get it:

Posted in Life in the United States | Comments Off on Summer Vacation is Here. Who Wants to Go Camping?

Test Your Creative Potential

 

Why are some people more creative (able to think of new and original ideas) than others?

Psychologists have sought (looked for) an answer to this question for many years, with some interesting hypotheses (guesses; theories).

Dean Keith Simonton at the University of California, Davis, is well known in the world of (field of; area of) psychology as the leading (one of the top or best) researchers in this area. Simonton has identified several factors (influences; items) that may influence creativity.

Here are some of those, categorized (classified) by whether they help or hinder (hurt) creativity. See which ones apply to you!

Help: Being born last in the family. Younger members of the family will get to see different kinds of role models (people whose actions and ideas you may want to imitate).

They are exposed to (experience) family conflicts and how they are resolved. These experiences can fuel (increase) original thinking.

Hurt: Being born first in the family. First-born children are more likely to think in conventional ways (traditional or commonly accepted ways).

Help: Taking time off. Taking a break from your work allows your ideas to incubate (develop slowly without interruptions) and gives original ideas a chance to grow.

Hurt: Resistance to change. People who don’t want to change are almost by definition (by that very fact) people who cannot be very creative, since being creative means doing something original and that hasn’t been done before.

Interestingly enough, Simonton found that those who too easily give up on an idea are also less creative. Sometimes we need to continue with an idea even though some of our ideas fail.

Help: Freedom to take risks. It’s hard to be creative if your boss won’t ever let you do anything different. Being able to work on a variety of (mixture of; different) things can help you think in different ways, and thereby (because of that fact) be more creative.

Hurt: Pressure to play it safe. To play it safe means to never take any risks, to always do things that have no possible danger involved. Again, almost by definition, this is something that will make you a less creative person, since creativity means sometimes doing things that might fail or even hurt your chances in the future.

Here’s how I did on this “test.”

  • I’m the youngest of my family, so that is a help.
  • I take frequent breaks from work – so many, my wife doesn’t think I’m actually working at all!
  • I probably “play it safe” on many things, so that hurts me.

How did you do?

~Jeff

P.S. Today’s post was originally a Culture Note from our Daily English #141 lesson. If you want to learn more about American culture and improve your English at the same time, check out our Unlimited English Membership here.

Here are some more lessons that are about creativity or explain the use of that word:

Daily English 312 – Different Work Styles

Daily English 1300 – Diversifying a Workplace

Cultural English 346

WAIT!
Before You Go . . .
Get our FREE, 9-Page Special Report
“5 Things You MUST Know to Improve Your English”

Learn how to improve your English faster than ever with the latest, research-proven methods. Download it to find out more!

Just fill out your first name and email address below to get it:

Posted in Life in the United States | Comments Off on Test Your Creative Potential

The Narrow Way to Improve Your English

Last week I gave a couple of tips on how to improve your English. If you haven’t read that, please read that now. (I’ll wait for you . . .)

In my post, I talked about “narrow reading,” where you read a lot of things about the same topic, in the same series of books (e.g. Harry Potter, Twilight), or by the same author.

The advantage of this “narrow” (not wide) way is simple: The more you know about a topic, the easier it is to understand it in English. And the more you understand, the faster you will pick up new words and phrases.

This same idea can be applied (used) with listening as well. Narrow listening is listening to things on the same topic.

For example, if you listen to five different news stories in English about the situation in the Middle East, each new story will probably get easier and easier for you.

Better still, you’ll start acquiring (picking up; get into your brain) the vocabulary and grammar used in the stories, without any “studying” or “memorizing.”

You can find things on the web on related topics and try listening to them.

Another way is to use our 1800+ Daily and Cultural English lessons that come with our Unlimited English Membership.

In these lessons, I talk about several of the same topics in more than one episode.

Let’s say you want to improve your business meeting English. First, you search our website for the lessons you want by either entering “business meeting” into our search box, or by clicking on the Business topic on this page.

Now, select 4-6 episodes that look interesting related to business meetings. Here are four examples:

Listen and read the first lesson. Then the second, and so on.

Each lesson is different, of course, but you will start to hear some of the same or similar expressions in many of them. Understanding will get easier the more you listen.

You can listen first, read first, or read and listen at the same time – it doesn’t matter too much. The important thing is that you are comprehending a lot of business English.

When you do enough reading and listening, you’ll be able to start using that language in your conversations.

Warning: Getting from listening/reading to speaking/writing takes time! Be patient. Trust that with more listening and reading, your brain will take care of the rest.

~Jeff

WAIT!
Before You Go . . .
Get our FREE, 9-Page Special Report
“5 Things You MUST Know to Improve Your English”

Learn how to improve your English faster than ever with the latest, research-proven methods. Download it to find out more!

Just fill out your first name and email address below to get it:

Posted in How to Learn English | Comments Off on The Narrow Way to Improve Your English

Top 2 Tips on Reading English the Easy Way

Listen and reading are the two main (most important) ways to improve your English.

Listening is important, but reading is also VERY powerful!

Reading will actually improve your English listening and speaking, as well as reading and writing.

To get the most out of (to take maximum advantage of) your reading, you need to
(a) pick English books or magazines that you mostly understand (more than 90%) AND
(b) pick books that you actually like reading, that you enjoy.

How do you do this? Here are two simple tips to help you:

TIP 1: Read the types of things you already read in your own language and on topics you’re already familiar with.

Knowing something about a topic will it make much easier to read about it in English.

For example, I read the news in English every day. You could call me a news junkie (someone who likes something a lot, perhaps too much).

When I read the news in French, especially on topics I already know something about, the French is much easier to understand.

If I read a story in French (or Italian or Spanish) about the United States, I can understand it very easily, since I already know something about the topic or subject.

And because I have read the news nearly every day of my adult life, I’m familiar with the format (organization) of newspapers. I know how news stories are organized. This experience makes reading the news in another language much easier.

If you don’t like to read in your own language, no problem. Consider what kinds of things you like to do instead.

Like soccer? Read books and articles about soccer.

Like playing video games? Read books and magazines about video games.

Like watching romantic comedies? Read romances in English!

TIP 2: Read what needs improving.

Here’s what I mean by that: If your goal is to improve your English conversation, read a lot of conversational English.

Pick fiction (made-up stories) that have a lot of dialogue rather than long descriptions.

The additional advantage of reading dialogue is that it is easier to understand, making it easier to read.

(Hint: Reading our lesson transcripts would be a good way to get that conversational English, of course!)

If you want to improve your English on a more specialized (on a smaller or more limited subject) topic, read things on that subject.

For example, if you want to do better business presentations, read more business books.

This type of reading is called “narrow reading,” reading on a limited topic.

Narrow reading will help you get the style and language you need.

Narrow reading works especially well for fiction books that are part of a series (books with the same characters), such as Harry Potter or Twilight or The Hunger Games.

I’m reading right now a series of young-adult novels (written for 8-12 year-olds) with a mystery and spy theme in French. The main characters in each book of the series are the same, so I already know something about them (see Tip 1).

If you read one Harry Potter book, the next one will be much easier to understand.

But remember that *all* reading on whatever topic is helpful, as long as you can understand 90%+ and you enjoy it.

If you pick your reading materials according to these tips, you are more likely to stick with it (continue) and not get bored, discouraged, and give up (stop trying).

So what are you waiting for? Start reading today!

~Jeff

P.S. It’s okay to “give up on” or stop reading a certain book if, after 20 pages or so, it seems too difficult or too boring. Just find another book!

WAIT!
Before You Go . . .
Get our FREE, 9-Page Special Report
“5 Things You MUST Know to Improve Your English”

Learn how to improve your English faster than ever with the latest, research-proven methods. Download it to find out more!

Just fill out your first name and email address below to get it:

Posted in Books and Reading, How to Learn English | Comments Off on Top 2 Tips on Reading English the Easy Way

Who Wants to Wash My Car?

My car is really dirty.

I mean, it has a lot of dirt and dust on the outside.

Why so dirty?

Two reasons:
1. I live in Los Angeles, where it rains only rarely in the summer, so there is no rain to “clean” it.
2. I really, really hate washing my car.

When people in the United States want to wash their car, they have many choices. They can use hoses (long, thin tubes that carry water) and buckets (containers for water) in their driveway (the paved area between the street and a garage).

But many Americans (like me) are lazy and would rather (prefer to) pay someone else to do it.

So they take their car to a car wash.

The most basic type of car wash is the self-serve car wash. In a self-serve wash, the car is driven to an area where there are coin-operated machines (machines that do something when one puts round, metal pieces of money into them).

One machine has a hose that will produce (make; give) hot or cold water, with or without soap, depending on which buttons (small things that are pushed to make a machine do different things) are pushed.

Another machine is attached to a vacuum (machine that sucks dirt from carpets and floors) to clean a car’s interior.

People often use self-serve car washes if they don’t have a place (such as a driveway) where they live to wash their car.

Automatic car washes are more popular because they are easier. The driver simply drives through the car wash, which is a small building.

Hoses spray (send liquid into the air) water and soap onto the car. Then large roller brushes (long, round tubes with pieces of cloth that move quickly in a circle) rub the car until it is clean (see photo).

Next, hot air is used to dry it, although usually not perfectly. After the car leaves the car wash building, workers dry the rest of the car with towels.

Driving through the car wash takes only a minute or two and it usually works pretty well, unless the car is very dirty.

When people want their cars to be really clean, they pay more for a hand wash, where a person or a group of people wash the car by hand (manually, without a machine).

A hand wash usually comes with a wax, too. Wax is a material you put on your car to protect it. A hand wash takes longer and is more expensive, but it is the best way to get a car really clean.

So what will I do – self-serve, automatic, or hand wash?

Probably none of them. I’ll just wait until it rains again in the fall.

~Jeff

P.S. I forgot to mention that my first job as a teenager (I was 15 years old) was at . . . a car wash! It was “automatic” but my job was to wipe the cars dry. I worked there for three months and hated every minute.

P.P.S. If you like this little culture lesson, consider starting an Unlimited English Membership, where you can get more than 1,800 daily and cultural English lessons. See here for details: https://tv.eslpod.com

WAIT!
Before You Go . . .
Get our FREE, 9-Page Special Report
“5 Things You MUST Know to Improve Your English”

Learn how to improve your English faster than ever with the latest, research-proven methods. Download it to find out more!

Just fill out your first name and email address below to get it:

Posted in Life in the United States | Comments Off on Who Wants to Wash My Car?

Speak English by Killing Birds and Beating Horses

I don’t like animals, especially cats. If you’ve listened to our old podcasts and current Daily English lessons, you probably know that already.

But you can’t say you speak English fluently without knowing and using idioms that have animals in them.

Here then are a few that you can use, whether you’re an animal lover or not:

To kill two birds with one stone – The idea of this expression is that you are able to accomplish two goals or tasks with one single action. (Stone is another word for a rock.)

Let’s say you want to do two things: meet your friends for coffee at a café, and pick up your wife from work. If your wife works close to a café, you could ask her to meet you at the café with your friends so you can drive her home from there.

You’re doing one thing (going to a cafe) but accomplishing two tasks (meeting your friends and eventually taking your wife home).

Of course, your wife may not like you telling her to walk to a local café from work, but that’s another problem entirely.

To be a guinea pig – Guinea pigs (see photo) are often used in scientific experimentation for new drugs or other products. Companies and laboratories test the drug or substance on the animal first to make sure it is safe.

To be a guinea pig means to be the person who tries something for the first time without knowing if it works or even if it is safe.

If I invented a new way to cut your hair and I tried it on you before anyone else, not sure if it would work, then you would be a guinea pig for my hair cutting method.

To beat a dead horse – If the horse is dead, there’s no need to beat (hit) it so that it will do what you want. It’s too late for that – nothing will happen!

We use this expression when someone wants to do something that won’t make any difference. It is often used to describe people who want to talk about a problem that has already been solved or that no one else wants to talk about anymore.

Strangely, you’ll often hear people use this phrase after “not” and followed by “but”: “Not to beat a dead horse, but I think . . . ” They are essentially saying, “I know this is a useless thing to say, but I’m going to say it anyway!”

Take/Grab the bull by the horns – A bull is the male of the same species as a cow, which is female. Bulls have the reputation of being very difficult to manage and even dangerous (think about bullfighting in Spain or Mexico). The horns of the bull are things that come out of his head and are hard and sharp.

To take a bull by the horns is to try to take on or solve a very difficult problem directly. It may cause you trouble, but you attempt to deal with the situation in a straightforward (very direct) way.

Does your language have similar animal expressions?

~Jeff

WAIT!
Before You Go . . .
Get our FREE, 9-Page Special Report
“5 Things You MUST Know to Improve Your English”

Learn how to improve your English faster than ever with the latest, research-proven methods. Download it to find out more!

Just fill out your first name and email address below to get it:

Posted in Language & Terms | Comments Off on Speak English by Killing Birds and Beating Horses

Congrats to the Grads!

June is the month for graduations, the completion of studies, both for high school and college/university students.

So what does a typical American graduation look like?

Most graduation ceremonies have two parts: (1) an awarding of degrees, where students come up and receive their diploma (certificate of graduation) from some school official; and (2) a speech, often by someone well known, called a commencement address.

These commencement addresses are usually 15-25 minutes long, and often contain advice to the graduates on how to live their lives.

For example, when I graduated from the University of Southern California, we had a former politician and vice-presidential candidate (Jack Kemp) give the commencement address. (I don’t remember anything he said.)

Actors, famous writers, and other celebrities are also sometimes invited by colleges to give these short speeches. Even the president of the United States gives commencement addresses.

At nearly every graduation ceremony (event), you’ll see graduating students wearing a cap and gown.

For high school students and college undergraduates (students earning a four-year degree), the “cap and gown” is the hat (cap) and robe (gown; like a dress) that a student wears to graduate.

The gown is typically black, but can also be the school colors, the colors that represent a school.

The cap can be different designs, but the most common one is what’s called a mortarboard (see photo), which is a hat with a flat, square top.

On top of the mortarboard is a tassel attached by a button at the center. A tassel is a decoration of loose threads (like strings) that are gathered or held together at one end, and worn hanging down over the brim or edge of the mortarboard.

At a graduation ceremony, the tradition is to let the tassel hang down from the mortarboard on the right-hand side at the start of the ceremony. When students receive their diploma, they move the tassel to the left side showing they’ve graduated.

After all of the students have received their diplomas, another tradition (but only in some schools) is for the students to throw their caps into the air to celebrate. Good luck finding your own cap again!

If you graduate with what we’d call a “higher degree” or “post-graduate” degree, such as a Master’s or Ph.D. (doctorate), the graduation ceremony is slightly different.

For these students, there is another part of the graduation gown called the hood.

Normally when we use the word “hood,” we mean a piece of material shaped like a half circle attached to the top of your jacket that goes over your head, either to protect the head or just to look cool.

A “hoodie” (also spelled “hoody”) is a sweatshirt (casual shirt usually made of thick cotton material) with a hood that is very popular in the U.S.

However, the hood that is part of the graduation gown doesn’t go over the head. Instead, it is a piece of colored and decorated fabric that is worn over the neck and hangs down the back of the graduation gown so that the “colors” show.

The color of the hood has special meaning. It is used to identify the type of degree you receive and your major (course of study). Different majors (sciences, humanities, education, etc.) have different colors.

That’s a brief look at American graduations. How are things different where you live? Do graduates also wear a cap and gown?

~Jeff

WAIT!
Before You Go . . .
Get our FREE, 9-Page Special Report
“5 Things You MUST Know to Improve Your English”

Learn how to improve your English faster than ever with the latest, research-proven methods. Download it to find out more!

Just fill out your first name and email address below to get it:

Posted in Life in the United States | Comments Off on Congrats to the Grads!