More American Football English

On Tuesday, I explained how American football is played and talked about the useful football-related term “to huddle.”

Here are two more expressions related to football that we use in everyday English.

Take a Punt

In football, when your team is unlikely to move forward the required 10 yards (see my last post for an explanation) and you know you have to give the ball to the other team, you may choose to punt.

A punt is when you drop the ball from your hands and kick it before it reaches the ground.

A punt is a good idea in this situation because it moves the ball as far from your team’s goal as possible, making it harder for the other team to score.

However, in everyday use, “to take a punt” means to take a chance, to try something even if you may not succeed.

If you are a great chef (professionally-trained cook), you may decide to take a punt at opening your own restaurant.

Another common expression you’ll hear is “It’s worth a punt,” meaning is worth a try, it has a chance to be successful.

Hail Mary Pass

In religion, Catholics often say a prayer (a request for help or way to give thanks) to Mary, Jesus’s mother. This is called the “Hail Mary” prayer.

In football, when a team is not advancing the ball as they need to, it may choose to throw a “Hail Mary pass.”

A Hail Mary pass is when a player throws the ball a long distance and hopes (prays?) that another player on his own team will catch it.

Hail Mary passes are acts of desperation (done with little hope of success). They usually don’t work. A team throws a Hail Mary pass when it’s close to the end of the game and scoring could mean the difference between winning or losing.

In everyday English, we use this phrase when we have very few or no other options and are trying a “long shot,” an action that has only a small chance of being successful.

However, if it succeeds, the reward or result is great!

If you want to be a movie star, but have not been able to get any acting jobs, you might thrown a Hail Mary pass by contacting your very distant (not closely related by blood) relative Steven Spielberg to ask for a part (acting job) in his new movie.

Your chances are not good, but if you succeed, you may be the next Tom Hanks.

~Jeff

P.S. For more information expressions related to sports and football, see our Daily English 145 – The Big Game.

P.P.S. Like this short English lesson? Get a FREE sample lesson (no money needed) – SIGN UP BELOW!

Just fill out the form below and we’ll send a FREE lesson to try!

We hate spam, too! We will never sell, rent, or give your information to anyone – ever!

What Will I Learn in My Free Lesson?

Here is just a small part of what you’re going to learn in this free lesson:

  • What “take a rain check” means and how to use it in a conversation . . .
  • The difference between a “recluse” and a “busybody” . . .
  • Why “to fend OFF” means something from “to fend FOR” . . .
  • What it means to “take a rain check,” “keep to yourself,” and “to appoint (someone)” . . .
  • What a social secretary is . . .
  • The best way to use “to sort out” and “to turn down” . . .
  • How to use phrasal verbs like “to settle in” and “to settle down” (they’re not the same!) . . .
Posted in Language & Terms | Comments Off on More American Football English

Football, American (English) Style

The American football season (time of year) started a few weeks ago.

Americans don’t call it “American football,” of course – it’s just football. That other sport the rest of the world calls “football” is known as “soccer” in the U.S.

Even if you’re not a football fan, you may have come across (seen or read) some English expressions that come from football.

First, a very brief (short) explanation of football (you can get a better description of football’s rules in our Cultural English lesson 388.)

Football is played with two teams, each with 11 players. It’s played on a rectangular field that is 120 yards long. There are two end zones or areas, one on each end.

The aim of the offense (the team with the ball) is to move the ball to the other team’s end zone to score (get points). The defense (the team without a ball) tries to stop the offense and get possession (control) of the ball.

The offense either runs with the ball or passes (throwing to another player) the ball toward the other team’s end zone.

Each team has four plays or “downs” to move the ball 10 yards. If it succeeds, it gets another four downs.

If it doesn’t succeed, the ball goes to the other team. Each team tries to score the highest number of points, with as many “touchdowns” (ball touching the opponent’s end zone) as possible.

I’ll start by explaining a common football-related term used in daily English: “Huddle.”

Huddle

Before each play or down, the offense, the team with the ball, goes into a “huddle.” That’s when the team members move close together in a circle to talk strategy (planned moves to win).

We use “huddle” in a similar way in everyday English.

At work, the boss may say, “Let’s huddle tomorrow at 9:00 a.m. to come up with a plan before we meet with the client.”

Or at home with your family, you may huddle to decide on the family budget (money plan) so there is enough money for food, clothes, and other family needs.

If my mother’s birthday is coming up, all of her 11 children might huddle to decide on a birthday present for her.

My mother recently had her 93rd birthday so there have been a lot of opportunities to huddle over the years!

Check back later this week when I explain two other football-related expressions: “To take a punt,” and “Hail Mary pass.”

~Jeff

P.S. Like this short English lesson? Get a FREE sample lesson (no money needed) – SIGN UP BELOW!

Just fill out the form below and we’ll send a FREE lesson to try!

We hate spam, too! We will never sell, rent, or give your information to anyone – ever!

What Will I Learn in My Free Lesson?

Here is just a small part of what you’re going to learn in this free lesson:

  • What “take a rain check” means and how to use it in a conversation . . .
  • The difference between a “recluse” and a “busybody” . . .
  • Why “to fend OFF” means something from “to fend FOR” . . .
  • What it means to “take a rain check,” “keep to yourself,” and “to appoint (someone)” . . .
  • What a social secretary is . . .
  • The best way to use “to sort out” and “to turn down” . . .
  • How to use phrasal verbs like “to settle in” and “to settle down” (they’re not the same!) . . .
Posted in Language & Terms, Life in the United States | Comments Off on Football, American (English) Style

Should You Do The Hustle? (Video)

“Hustle” has several different meanings in English. Find out what they are in this short video:

And take a look at our Cultural English 226 lesson, where we talk more about “hustle.”

~Jeff

P.S. Like this short English lesson? Get a FREE sample lesson (no money needed) – SIGN UP BELOW!

Just fill out the form below and we’ll send a FREE lesson to try!

We hate spam, too! We will never sell, rent, or give your information to anyone – ever!

What Will I Learn in My Free Lesson?

Here is just a small part of what you’re going to learn in this free lesson:

  • What “take a rain check” means and how to use it in a conversation . . .
  • The difference between a “recluse” and a “busybody” . . .
  • Why “to fend OFF” means something from “to fend FOR” . . .
  • What it means to “take a rain check,” “keep to yourself,” and “to appoint (someone)” . . .
  • What a social secretary is . . .
  • The best way to use “to sort out” and “to turn down” . . .
  • How to use phrasal verbs like “to settle in” and “to settle down” (they’re not the same!) . . .
Posted in Discussing the Episodes, Language & Terms | Comments Off on Should You Do The Hustle? (Video)

What is an “Empty Nest”? (Video)

What does it mean to have an “empty nest”? Find out in this short 3-minute video:

Check out the lesson I talk about in this video, Daily English 444 – Planning for Retirement.

And get more information on our Unlimited English Membership, with 1800+ English lessons, here.

~Jeff

P.S. Like this short English lesson? Get a FREE sample lesson (no money needed) – SIGN UP BELOW!

Just fill out the form below and we’ll send a FREE lesson to try!

We hate spam, too! We will never sell, rent, or give your information to anyone – ever!

What Will I Learn in My Free Lesson?

Here is just a small part of what you’re going to learn in this free lesson:

  • What “take a rain check” means and how to use it in a conversation . . .
  • The difference between a “recluse” and a “busybody” . . .
  • Why “to fend OFF” means something from “to fend FOR” . . .
  • What it means to “take a rain check,” “keep to yourself,” and “to appoint (someone)” . . .
  • What a social secretary is . . .
  • The best way to use “to sort out” and “to turn down” . . .
  • How to use phrasal verbs like “to settle in” and “to settle down” (they’re not the same!) . . .
Posted in Discussing the Episodes, Language & Terms | Comments Off on What is an “Empty Nest”? (Video)

How to Practice Your English

What is “practice” for improving your English?

Many people – teachers, students, people on the Internet – think that “practice” means actually speaking English or writing emails, or perhaps talking to yourself in the mirror or repeating what other people are saying (sometimes called “shadowing”).

In applied linguistics, we call this sort of “practice” output.

Output is what, well, comes “out” of something.

Language comes “out” of your brain – through your mouth (speaking) or your keyboard/hand (writing).

There may be some benefits (good things) about a certain amount of output, but the MAIN way of improving your language skills is not through output.

What really helps you is the opposite of output: input.

Input is what goes “in” your brain.

Getting more input is the RIGHT kind of practice for improving your speaking – even though you are not actually speaking!

What exactly do I mean by “input”?

It’s simple: LISTENING and READING.

Think of it this way:

INPUT (listening/reading)–>BRAIN–>OUTPUT (speaking/writing)

What goes in your ears (listening) or eyes (reading) is much more important than any kind of output.

In other words, we get better at speaking not by speaking, but by listening and reading.

Your brain has to “get” or receive language before it can “give” language. If you don’t focus on “getting” more input, you have nothing to “output”!

You have to put money INTO in your bank account before you can take money OUT of your bank account.

Reading and listening are like money you put in your brain’s “language bank account.”

When we study people who become really good at second languages, we find that ALL of them have “practiced” the language thousands of hours by doing these two things: lots of listening and (especially) lots of reading.

So if you’re looking for the fastest way to improve your English speaking, you really do need to “practice” it everyday – even 15 minutes a day will help you.

But don’t sit on the couch (sofa) eating potato chips!

That’s the wrong kind of practice.

Instead, get lots of and lots of INPUT – listen and read as much as you can.*

That’s the way to “winning” better English.

~Jeff

*The input you read or listen to has to be something you can UNDERSTAND, however. It is no good listening or reading things that are too hard for you. That’s also a waste of time.

We have 450+ hours and more than 10,000 pages of understandable English in our Unlimited English program – you can find out more here.

P.S. Like this short English lesson? Get a FREE sample lesson (no money needed) – SIGN UP BELOW!

Just fill out the form below and we’ll send a FREE lesson to try!

We hate spam, too! We will never sell, rent, or give your information to anyone – ever!

What Will I Learn in My Free Lesson?

Here is just a small part of what you’re going to learn in this free lesson:

  • What “take a rain check” means and how to use it in a conversation . . .
  • The difference between a “recluse” and a “busybody” . . .
  • Why “to fend OFF” means something from “to fend FOR” . . .
  • What it means to “take a rain check,” “keep to yourself,” and “to appoint (someone)” . . .
  • What a social secretary is . . .
  • The best way to use “to sort out” and “to turn down” . . .
  • How to use phrasal verbs like “to settle in” and “to settle down” (they’re not the same!) . . .
Posted in How to Learn English | Comments Off on How to Practice Your English

Absentee Ballots and Voting By Mail

This is an important year in the U.S., an election year.

An election is an event that allows people of a country, state, or city to officially choose their government officials.

This year is especially important because it is a year for selecting our country’s president, what we call a presidential election year.

Presidential elections occur every four years in the United States.

The federal or national election day is always the first Tuesday of November, so this year it will be November 3rd.

You probably already know that the two candidates are the incumbent (current; serving) President Donald Trump, and former Vice President Joe Biden.

But this year, the election will be tricky (difficult because of possible problems) because of the coronavirus.

Normally, most people vote at a polling place, the temporary places where people can go to get their ballots (official forms for voting) and to cast their vote (make their selections). Many people will probably still do this.

But because of the coronavirus, lots of people will be voting by mail. They will receive their ballots in the mail, vote at home, and mail in their ballots so they can be counted (recorded).

Voting by mail is not new. In past elections, every state has had absentee ballots.

To be absent means to not be where someone is expected or is supposed to be, so an absentee ballot is for a person who is not at the polling place to vote.

In some states, such as California, anyone can request an absentee ballot. For many years now, I’ve voted with an absentee ballot because it is easier and more convenient.

I normally get my ballot in the mail about one month before the election and mail it back by election day.

In other states, to get an absentee ballot, you have typically needed an excuse (a reason) that prevents (not allows) you from going to a polling place, including:

  • an illness, injury (being hurt), or a disability (permanent physical or mental issue that limits your movement or activities);
  • being away from home on election day because of work or vacation; or
  • studying at college in another state.

This year, because of COVID-19, every state will offer voting by mail. This has caused a lot of concern (worry).

First, some people worry that voting by mail may be less secure (safe) and allow for more voter fraud (cheating).

In addition to absentee ballots, some states (such as California) for the first time are sending ballots to everyone on their voter rolls (lists of registered voters), even if the voter has not requested a ballot.

Some fear that these voter rolls may not be up-to-date (have the latest information) or accurate.

Second, mail service has been less reliable in the past five months than it was before the COVID crisis. This may be because of the coronavirus, changes by the leaders of the post office, or both.

Whatever the reason, there is worry that not all ballots will arrive at the voter’s home or that completed ballots may not arrive back to be counted in time.

Third, the number of mailed ballots this year will be much higher than in past elections, meaning it may take some states days or even weeks to count all the paper ballots.

Only time will tell (We will only know later) whether these concerns are warranted (should really have worried us).

No matter what, for good or ill (because of good or bad reasons), this will be a memorable (difficult to forget) election year!

~Jeff

P.S. Learn more about American elections and politics in Daily English 733 – Voting in an Election, Daily English 1230 – Expressing Disapproval of Elected Officials, and Cultural English 161 (about registering to vote).

P.P.S. Like this short English lesson? Get a FREE sample lesson (no money needed) – SIGN UP BELOW!

Just fill out the form below and we’ll send a FREE lesson to try!

We hate spam, too! We will never sell, rent, or give your information to anyone – ever!

What Will I Learn in My Free Lesson?

Here is just a small part of what you’re going to learn in this free lesson:

  • What “take a rain check” means and how to use it in a conversation . . .
  • The difference between a “recluse” and a “busybody” . . .
  • Why “to fend OFF” means something from “to fend FOR” . . .
  • What it means to “take a rain check,” “keep to yourself,” and “to appoint (someone)” . . .
  • What a social secretary is . . .
  • The best way to use “to sort out” and “to turn down” . . .
  • How to use phrasal verbs like “to settle in” and “to settle down” (they’re not the same!) . . .
Posted in Life in the United States | Comments Off on Absentee Ballots and Voting By Mail

3 Expressions That Don’t Mean What You Think They Mean

As you know, just learning the meaning of individual words isn’t enough to understand everyday English.

There are many expressions for which simply defining the meaning of each individual word would be misleading (give you the wrong idea).

That’s what an “idiom” is – an expression that is more than the meanings of the individual words.

Case in point (Showing this exact idea) are three idioms that don’t mean what you may think.

HE’S/SHE’S A KEEPER

A “keeper” is someone who manages or cares for animals. A “zookeeper” takes care of animals in a zoo, a park where different animals are placed in cages for people to see.

A “beekeeper” keeps and cares for bees (an insect that buzzes and makes honey).

But in the expression “he’s/she’s a keeper,” we do not mean he or she keeps animals!

The verb to keep also means to have something, to hold on to something, and that’s the meaning we need for this idiom.

So “he’s/she’s a keeper” means that this person has good qualities and would be a good person for a long-term romantic relationship.

When I brought my girlfriend (now wife) home for the first time to meet my parents, my father said to me, “Son, she’s a keeper.”

It’s a compliment (something nice said about someone) to both you and your girlfriend.

(The next thing my father said was, “Why would a nice woman like her want to be with YOU?!”)

TELL ME ABOUT IT!

Normally, if someone says “tell me about it,” they are asking you to give them detailed information about an event or experience.

But when we say this expression with feeling (strong emotion) and an emphasis on the world “tell” — “TELL me about it!” — we mean that we strongly agree with what the other person has said, probably because we have had that same experience before.

If you’ve been working extra hours at work, you may say to your friend, “I’ve been working too hard and I need a vacation!”

You friend might respond, “Tell me about it! I’ve worked for two weeks without a day off and I’m dead (very) tired!”

TO BREAK A BILL

The word “bill” has many meanings, but the one referred to in this expression is paper money.

The most common American bills are $1, $5, $10, and $20 bills. (We would say, for example, a “one-dollar bill” or “twenty-dollar bill.”)

To break something is to use force to harm something so that it falls apart into pieces. If you drop a dinner plate on the floor, it will break.

But if you “break a bill,” you’re not destroying or harming a piece of paper money. Instead, you are asking someone to give you smaller bills or coins.

For example, if you need some $1 bills and you only have a $20 bill, you could ask a cashier (person excepting payment in a store), “Can you break a 20-dollar bill?” or simply, “Can you break a 20?”

He or she will know that you are asking for bills or coins in smaller denominations (values), such as 10 $1 bills and one $10 bill.

Things aren’t always what they seem (appear) and that’s certainly true of English!

~Jeff

P.S. For more explanations of “tell me about it,” see our Cultural English 39 or Daily English 460 – Working in a Bad Economy.

For more about the word “bill,” see our Daily English 191 – Changing Money.

Even better, to get all 1800+ Daily and Cultural English lessons as part of our Unlimited English Membership here.

P.P.S. Like this short English lesson? Get a FREE sample lesson (no money needed) – SIGN UP BELOW!

Just fill out the form below and we’ll send a FREE lesson to try!

We hate spam, too! We will never sell, rent, or give your information to anyone – ever!

What Will I Learn in My Free Lesson?

Here is just a small part of what you’re going to learn in this free lesson:

  • What “take a rain check” means and how to use it in a conversation . . .
  • The difference between a “recluse” and a “busybody” . . .
  • Why “to fend OFF” means something from “to fend FOR” . . .
  • What it means to “take a rain check,” “keep to yourself,” and “to appoint (someone)” . . .
  • What a social secretary is . . .
  • The best way to use “to sort out” and “to turn down” . . .
  • How to use phrasal verbs like “to settle in” and “to settle down” (they’re not the same!) . . .
Posted in Language & Terms | Comments Off on 3 Expressions That Don’t Mean What You Think They Mean

Raising versus Begging the Question

In our Daily English 210 – A Family Road Trip, we use the expression, “to question the wisdom of (something).”

In this short video, I explain two more expressions with “question”: to raise the question and to beg the question.

NOTE: In the video, I explain the traditional use of “beg the question.” However, people in current American English often use “beg the question” to mean the same as “raise the question,” meaning “to provoke” or “to cause you to ask the question.” For example:

You’re late again, which begs the question, “Is your alarm clock working?”

In this example, we could have said “…which raises the question…” instead of “begs the question.”

~Jeff

P.S. Like this short English lesson? Get a FREE sample lesson (no money needed) – SIGN UP BELOW!

Just fill out the form below and we’ll send a FREE lesson to try!

We hate spam, too! We will never sell, rent, or give your information to anyone – ever!

What Will I Learn in My Free Lesson?

Here is just a small part of what you’re going to learn in this free lesson:

  • What “take a rain check” means and how to use it in a conversation . . .
  • The difference between a “recluse” and a “busybody” . . .
  • Why “to fend OFF” means something from “to fend FOR” . . .
  • What it means to “take a rain check,” “keep to yourself,” and “to appoint (someone)” . . .
  • What a social secretary is . . .
  • The best way to use “to sort out” and “to turn down” . . .
  • How to use phrasal verbs like “to settle in” and “to settle down” (they’re not the same!) . . .

 

Posted in Language & Terms | Comments Off on Raising versus Begging the Question

Labor Day

Yesterday was Labor Day in the United States. Labor Day is a federal (national) holiday that honors (shows respect to or celebrates) workers.

“Labor” is another word for work, especially hard, physical work.

How did Labor Day get started in the U.S.?

In 1882, members of the New York Central Labor Union thought it was a good idea to have a day celebrating workers. (A union is an organized group of workers that is formed to protect their rights and interests.)

Since there were four long months between the national holidays for Independence Day (July 4th) and Thanksgiving (last Thursday in November), the union decided to create a holiday in between.

The first Labor Day was on September 5, 1882. It was celebrated with a parade (people walking or marching together down a street, usually with music, with a lot of people watching).

New York’s Labor Day celebration caught on (became popular). Workers in other states began celebrating it.

Oregon was the first state to make it a legal holiday and many states followed (did the same). In 1894, the U.S. Congress (national lawmaking group) passed a law making Labor Day a national holiday.

Labor Day is now celebrated on the first Monday in September.

For many decades (groups of 10 years), workers saw Labor Day as an opportunity to raise awareness (get attention) for better working conditions and wages (pay for work).

Nowadays (Now), Labor Day is associated less with union activities and more with relaxing. Americans often spend the day having barbecues (cooking outdoors over a fire), family picnics (eating outdoors, usually sitting on the ground), or playing or watching sports, like the world’s greatest sport, baseball.

Celebrating Labor Day myself yesterday, I was reminded of two common idioms that include the word “labor.”

“Labor of Love”

A “labor of love” is something you do because you enjoy doing it, not because you can earn money from it or get some other benefit.

Maybe you are working on your old car to restore (return) it to its original condition. You do that not because you need a car to drive or you want to sell it, but because it is interesting and enjoyable work. You love it!

That’s how ESLPod.com began. I started ESL Podcast in 2005 as a labor of love and it continues to give me a lot of joy talking to myself.

“Fruits of (one’s) Labor”

The “fruits of (one’s) labor” refers to the benefits or rewards you get as a result of your work.

If you start a business and work hard at it and it becomes successful, you can enjoy the fruits of your labor, including the money and satisfaction that you’ve gained.

And for me, the fruits of my labor on ESLPod.com is knowing that we’re helping people all around the world to learn English – and to sound just like me.

~Jeff

P.S. Check out (take a look at) these ESLPod Unlimited English lessons related to labor:

Labor Day:
Cultural English 49

Unions:
Daily English 880 – Forming a Union

Workers’ Rights:
Daily English 252 – A Workers Strike

P.P.S. Like this short English lesson? Get a FREE sample lesson (no money needed) – SIGN UP BELOW!

Just fill out the form below and we’ll send a FREE lesson to try!

We hate spam, too! We will never sell, rent, or give your information to anyone – ever!

What Will I Learn in My Free Lesson?

Here is just a small part of what you’re going to learn in this free lesson:

  • What “take a rain check” means and how to use it in a conversation . . .
  • The difference between a “recluse” and a “busybody” . . .
  • Why “to fend OFF” means something from “to fend FOR” . . .
  • What it means to “take a rain check,” “keep to yourself,” and “to appoint (someone)” . . .
  • What a social secretary is . . .
  • The best way to use “to sort out” and “to turn down” . . .
  • How to use phrasal verbs like “to settle in” and “to settle down” (they’re not the same!) . . .
Posted in Life in the United States | Comments Off on Labor Day

What Do Bears and Bulls Have to Do with the Stock Market?

Many Americans are invested in (have money in) the stock market, especially for their retirement (when they stop working).

A stock is part-ownership in a company. A stock market is a place where you can buy and sell stocks.

Companies that want to raise (collect; bring together) money can offer part ownership in their company by selling shares (individual pieces of) of stock.

In the past several months, the stock market in the U.S. has been very volatile (unpredictable; difficult to know what will happen next).

When the stock market is doing poorly, stock traders call that a “bear market.” (A bear is a large animal that walks on two or four legs and has thick fur (hair).)

There are other commonly-used terms to talk about a falling (losing money) market, including “downturn,” “plunge/dive,” and “crash.”

A downturn is a slow drop or decline in the economy (the wealth or resources of a country).

For example: “The current housing market downturn is making homes more affordable (easier to buy).”

When stock prices plunge or take a dive, they drop a lot. Both “plunge” and “take a dive” are actually swimming expressions.

A “plunge” is any quick drop into the water, while a “dive” is quick jump head first into the water, usually with your arms raised above your head.

So we could say, “The tech company’s stock plunged/took a dive when the company announced its poor sales figures (numbers).”

But when stock market prices drop very suddenly and by a lot, that’s called a crash.

The most famous stock market crash in the U.S. was in 1929 and it led to the Great Depression (see Cultural English 327).

When the stock market is doing well, stock traders call that a “bull market.” (A bull is a male cow, usually with horns.)

You can also use the terms “uptick,” “rally,” and “boom” to describe the market when it’s doing well.

If stock prices go up a little bit, we say that there is an “uptick in prices” or an “uptick in the market.”

When prices go up quickly and by a lot, we would call that a “rally.” Usually, rallies last a short time: minutes, hours, or even a few days.

But when rallies last a long time, we call that a stock market “boom.”

Note that we can have “boom” in other parts of the economy, too. When an individual company is experiencing a boom, it means that their sales are high, they are selling a lot of their product or services.

Even a country can have a boom, meaning that many sectors or areas of a country’s economy are doing very well.

No one knows where the current volatile stock market is headed (where it will go), so if you have money in the stock market, get ready for a wild ride (unpredictable journey with a lot of ups and downs)!

~Jeff

P.S. For more information on stock markets, check out some of our Daily English lessons as part of our Unlimited English Membership:

Daily English 276 – The Stock Market

Daily English 1048 – Launching an Initial Public Offering

Cultural English 224 – NY Stock Exchange

P.P.S. Like this short English lesson? Get a FREE sample lesson (no money needed) – SIGN UP BELOW!

Just fill out the form below and we’ll send a FREE lesson to try!

We hate spam, too! We will never sell, rent, or give your information to anyone – ever!

What Will I Learn in My Free Lesson?

Here is just a small part of what you’re going to learn in this free lesson:

  • What “take a rain check” means and how to use it in a conversation . . .
  • The difference between a “recluse” and a “busybody” . . .
  • Why “to fend OFF” means something from “to fend FOR” . . .
  • What it means to “take a rain check,” “keep to yourself,” and “to appoint (someone)” . . .
  • What a social secretary is . . .
  • The best way to use “to sort out” and “to turn down” . . .
  • How to use phrasal verbs like “to settle in” and “to settle down” (they’re not the same!) . . .
Posted in Life in the United States | Comments Off on What Do Bears and Bulls Have to Do with the Stock Market?