Why Can’t I Speak English Better?

Do you wonder why you can’t learn English faster and speak better?

This video gives you some reasons why AND what you can do about them.

For even more information on *how* to improve your English, read my special report, “5 Things You MUST Know to Improve Your English.”

~Jeff

P.S. Like this English lesson? Get a FREE sample lesson (no money needed) – SIGN UP BELOW!

Just fill out the form below and we’ll send a FREE lesson to try!

We hate spam, too! We will never sell, rent, or give your information to anyone – ever!

What Will I Learn in My Free Lesson?

Here is just a small part of what you’re going to learn in this free lesson:

  • What “take a rain check” means and how to use it in a conversation . . .
  • The difference between a “recluse” and a “busybody” . . .
  • Why “to fend OFF” means something from “to fend FOR” . . .
  • What it means to “take a rain check,” “keep to yourself,” and “to appoint (someone)” . . .
  • What a social secretary is . . .
  • The best way to use “to sort out” and “to turn down” . . .
  • How to use phrasal verbs like “to settle in” and “to settle down” (they’re not the same!) . . .
Posted in How to Learn English | Comments Off on Why Can’t I Speak English Better?

Are You a Jack of All Trades, Master of None?

Jack” has many different meanings and uses in English. Find out how to use them correctly in this video.

I’ll explain how to use “jack” in different expressions, including:

  • a man named John
  • something for your car
  • a playing card
  • “jack of all trades, master of none”
  • “you don’t know jack”

For more on “jack,” see our Daily English 416 – Finding a Niche in Business.

~Jeff

P.S. Like this English lesson? Get a FREE sample lesson (no money needed) – SIGN UP BELOW!

Just fill out the form below and we’ll send a FREE lesson to try!

We hate spam, too! We will never sell, rent, or give your information to anyone – ever!

What Will I Learn in My Free Lesson?

Here is just a small part of what you’re going to learn in this free lesson:

  • What “take a rain check” means and how to use it in a conversation . . .
  • The difference between a “recluse” and a “busybody” . . .
  • Why “to fend OFF” means something from “to fend FOR” . . .
  • What it means to “take a rain check,” “keep to yourself,” and “to appoint (someone)” . . .
  • What a social secretary is . . .
  • The best way to use “to sort out” and “to turn down” . . .
  • How to use phrasal verbs like “to settle in” and “to settle down” (they’re not the same!) . . .
Posted in Language & Terms | Comments Off on Are You a Jack of All Trades, Master of None?

What’s a Pair of Pairs?

A “pair” refers to two things. But can you have a pair of pairs?

And what words do you have to use “pair” with?

Learn all about using “pair” in this video.

For more information on pair and pairs, see our Daily English 5 – Getting Dressed and Ready for Work.

~Jeff

P.S. Like this English lesson? Get a FREE sample lesson (no money needed) – SIGN UP BELOW!

Just fill out the form below and we’ll send a FREE lesson to try!

We hate spam, too! We will never sell, rent, or give your information to anyone – ever!

What Will I Learn in My Free Lesson?

Here is just a small part of what you’re going to learn in this free lesson:

  • What “take a rain check” means and how to use it in a conversation . . .
  • The difference between a “recluse” and a “busybody” . . .
  • Why “to fend OFF” means something from “to fend FOR” . . .
  • What it means to “take a rain check,” “keep to yourself,” and “to appoint (someone)” . . .
  • What a social secretary is . . .
  • The best way to use “to sort out” and “to turn down” . . .
  • How to use phrasal verbs like “to settle in” and “to settle down” (they’re not the same!) . . .
Posted in Language & Terms | Comments Off on What’s a Pair of Pairs?

Put Some “ish” in Your English

What’s the difference between someone saying “I’m hungry” and “I’m hungryish”?

You’ll hear a lot of words ending in “-ish” in conversational English, but what does this suffix (word ending) really mean?

Find out about the differences in how we turn nouns to adjectives with –ish and how to use them in a sentence.

For more on “ish,” see our Cultural English 324 lesson here.

~Jeff

P.S. Like this English lesson? Get a FREE sample lesson (no money needed) – SIGN UP BELOW!

Just fill out the form below and we’ll send a FREE lesson to try!

We hate spam, too! We will never sell, rent, or give your information to anyone – ever!

What Will I Learn in My Free Lesson?

Here is just a small part of what you’re going to learn in this free lesson:

  • What “take a rain check” means and how to use it in a conversation . . .
  • The difference between a “recluse” and a “busybody” . . .
  • Why “to fend OFF” means something from “to fend FOR” . . .
  • What it means to “take a rain check,” “keep to yourself,” and “to appoint (someone)” . . .
  • What a social secretary is . . .
  • The best way to use “to sort out” and “to turn down” . . .
  • How to use phrasal verbs like “to settle in” and “to settle down” (they’re not the same!) . . .
Posted in Language & Terms | Comments Off on Put Some “ish” in Your English

Don’t Ever Say “Thank”

There are some nouns in English that are only used in the plural (with an -s at the end).

Learn why you should never use these nouns in the singular:

  • thanks/congratulations
  • contents
  • earnings
  • amends

For more on plural nouns, see our Cultural English 97 lesson.

~Jeff

P.S. Like this English lesson? Get a FREE sample lesson (no money needed) – SIGN UP BELOW!

Just fill out the form below and we’ll send a FREE lesson to try!

We hate spam, too! We will never sell, rent, or give your information to anyone – ever!

What Will I Learn in My Free Lesson?

Here is just a small part of what you’re going to learn in this free lesson:

  • What “take a rain check” means and how to use it in a conversation . . .
  • The difference between a “recluse” and a “busybody” . . .
  • Why “to fend OFF” means something from “to fend FOR” . . .
  • What it means to “take a rain check,” “keep to yourself,” and “to appoint (someone)” . . .
  • What a social secretary is . . .
  • The best way to use “to sort out” and “to turn down” . . .
  • How to use phrasal verbs like “to settle in” and “to settle down” (they’re not the same!) . . .
Posted in Language & Terms | Comments Off on Don’t Ever Say “Thank”

Guess Where These Words Come From

I recently talked about “loanwords” in a short video about “glitch” and “ketchup.”

Today, I talk about three more common loanwords in English:

cul-de-sac

kudos

angst

To expand your vocabulary even faster, check our our Unlimited English Membership here.

~Jeff

P.S. Like this English lesson? Get a FREE sample lesson (no money needed) – SIGN UP BELOW!

Just fill out the form below and we’ll send a FREE lesson to try!

We hate spam, too! We will never sell, rent, or give your information to anyone – ever!

What Will I Learn in My Free Lesson?

Here is just a small part of what you’re going to learn in this free lesson:

  • What “take a rain check” means and how to use it in a conversation . . .
  • The difference between a “recluse” and a “busybody” . . .
  • Why “to fend OFF” means something from “to fend FOR” . . .
  • What it means to “take a rain check,” “keep to yourself,” and “to appoint (someone)” . . .
  • What a social secretary is . . .
  • The best way to use “to sort out” and “to turn down” . . .
  • How to use phrasal verbs like “to settle in” and “to settle down” (they’re not the same!) . . .
Posted in Language & Terms | Comments Off on Guess Where These Words Come From

“Literally” is Literally English’s Most Confusing Word

“Literal” and “figurative” are two types of meaning in English, but they are often confused (even by native English speakers!).

Learn the difference between them in this video, and why Americans who say “I was literally starving” will not die soon of hunger.

For more on the use of “literally,” see our Daily English 840 – Translating a Document and Cultural English 334.

~Jeff

P.S. Like this English lesson? Get a FREE sample lesson (no money needed) – SIGN UP BELOW!

Just fill out the form below and we’ll send a FREE lesson to try!

We hate spam, too! We will never sell, rent, or give your information to anyone – ever!

What Will I Learn in My Free Lesson?

Here is just a small part of what you’re going to learn in this free lesson:

  • What “take a rain check” means and how to use it in a conversation . . .
  • The difference between a “recluse” and a “busybody” . . .
  • Why “to fend OFF” means something from “to fend FOR” . . .
  • What it means to “take a rain check,” “keep to yourself,” and “to appoint (someone)” . . .
  • What a social secretary is . . .
  • The best way to use “to sort out” and “to turn down” . . .
  • How to use phrasal verbs like “to settle in” and “to settle down” (they’re not the same!) . . .
Posted in Language & Terms | Comments Off on “Literally” is Literally English’s Most Confusing Word

How Not to be a Sucker in English

The famous showman P.T. Barnum said, “There’s a sucker born every minute.” (Learn more about P.T. Barnum in our Cultural English 257 here.)

Learn in this video what a “sucker” is, why you do *not* want to be one, and how we use this terms in conversational English.

~Jeff

P.S. Like this English lesson? Get a FREE sample lesson (no money needed) – SIGN UP BELOW!

Just fill out the form below and we’ll send a FREE lesson to try!

We hate spam, too! We will never sell, rent, or give your information to anyone – ever!

What Will I Learn in My Free Lesson?

Here is just a small part of what you’re going to learn in this free lesson:

  • What “take a rain check” means and how to use it in a conversation . . .
  • The difference between a “recluse” and a “busybody” . . .
  • Why “to fend OFF” means something from “to fend FOR” . . .
  • What it means to “take a rain check,” “keep to yourself,” and “to appoint (someone)” . . .
  • What a social secretary is . . .
  • The best way to use “to sort out” and “to turn down” . . .
  • How to use phrasal verbs like “to settle in” and “to settle down” (they’re not the same!) . . .
Posted in Language & Terms | Comments Off on How Not to be a Sucker in English

Words English Stole from Other Languages

A loanword is a term one language takes from another language to use with little or no change to the word itself.

English has “stolen” lots of words from other languages! Learn about the meaning and uses of two of those in this video:

  • Ketchup
  • Glitch

~Jeff

P.S. Like this English lesson? Get a FREE sample lesson (no money needed) – SIGN UP BELOW!

Just fill out the form below and we’ll send a FREE lesson to try!

We hate spam, too! We will never sell, rent, or give your information to anyone – ever!

What Will I Learn in My Free Lesson?

Here is just a small part of what you’re going to learn in this free lesson:

  • What “take a rain check” means and how to use it in a conversation . . .
  • The difference between a “recluse” and a “busybody” . . .
  • Why “to fend OFF” means something from “to fend FOR” . . .
  • What it means to “take a rain check,” “keep to yourself,” and “to appoint (someone)” . . .
  • What a social secretary is . . .
  • The best way to use “to sort out” and “to turn down” . . .
  • How to use phrasal verbs like “to settle in” and “to settle down” (they’re not the same!) . . .
Posted in Language & Terms | Comments Off on Words English Stole from Other Languages

Take This Quiz to Improve Your English

Which of these people is more likely to become a great English speaker?

A. A person who works hard to learn every new word they see or hear in English.
B. A person who doesn’t study English, but listens to and watches a lot of English because they enjoy it.

The answer is B.

Why?

Find out by getting my report: 5 Things You MUST Know to Improve Your English

~Jeff

P.S. Like this English lesson? Get a FREE sample lesson (no money needed) – SIGN UP BELOW!

Just fill out the form below and we’ll send a FREE lesson to try!

We hate spam, too! We will never sell, rent, or give your information to anyone – ever!

What Will I Learn in My Free Lesson?

Here is just a small part of what you’re going to learn in this free lesson:

  • What “take a rain check” means and how to use it in a conversation . . .
  • The difference between a “recluse” and a “busybody” . . .
  • Why “to fend OFF” means something from “to fend FOR” . . .
  • What it means to “take a rain check,” “keep to yourself,” and “to appoint (someone)” . . .
  • What a social secretary is . . .
  • The best way to use “to sort out” and “to turn down” . . .
  • How to use phrasal verbs like “to settle in” and “to settle down” (they’re not the same!) . . .
Posted in How to Learn English | Comments Off on Take This Quiz to Improve Your English