Category Archives: Language & Terms

How to Win a Gold Medal in Speaking English

Have you been watching the Olympics? It’s fun to see such amazing performances by athletes. How do they get to be so good? The obvious answer is “practice.” They spend thousands of hours working hard, improving a little bit everyday. … Continue reading

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What Does “To Be Livid” Mean?

Today I talk about the meaning of the word livid in English. Watch this short video to learn what it means and how we use it: Get more information about Unlimited English here. ~Jeff Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/eslpod Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/eslpod? Learn English … Continue reading

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Punctuation: The Game Changer*

We all know that punctuation — marks in writing, such as ” “, : , and ! — is important. Sometimes just a small change in punctuation can change the entire meaning of a sentence. For example, consider (look at and … Continue reading

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My Thanksgiving Dinner, 2017

1. Here’s the turkey I cooked for Thanksgiving – ready to go into the oven! 2. Now you see the turkey 2.5 hours later – ready to go into my mouth! 3. After the turkey, there is of course pumpkin … Continue reading

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That’s a Contronym. Yes it is. No it’s not.

The English language is full of quirks (strange things). One of them is contronyms. Contronyms are words with two opposite meanings. Knowing which of its meanings is being used depends on the context (the words around it). Here are two contronyms … Continue reading

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Yiddish Words in Daily English

The Yiddish language originated in Central Europe in the 9th century A.D., spoken largely by the Jewish communities there. It spread to other parts of Europe (especially Germany), and was widely spoken in several countries prior to World War II. … Continue reading

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Do You Feel Lucky, Punk?

*punk: a worthless person; a young and inexperienced person, who believes he or she is very skilled and knowledgeable –> “Who is that punk? He says he can beat anyone in a game of tennis.” *to have (got) nothing on … Continue reading

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How to Cross the Street (in English)

Yes, you already know how to cross the street. You don’t need an English lesson for that. But what about understanding the language on a crosswalk sign? Watch the short video explanation below. It could save your life someday! Jeff … Continue reading

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Thick as Thieves

When I was growing up, my best friend was Marlene. We became friends in the third grade when we were about 10 years old. We hung around (spent free time) with each other all the time. In fact, we were practically … Continue reading

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You Think You’re a Genius? Ditto.

You will sometimes hear Americans use the word “ditto” in a conversation. Ditto is used as a response to what someone else has said to mean “That is true for me, too” or “The same with me,” as in: Edmund: … Continue reading

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